“ether minedrift i Indien”

“ether minedrift i Indien”

Sorry I meant to say September 3rd to January 3rd which is exactly 4 months. On September 3rd mining difficulty was 8.355 and on january 4th (exactly 4 months later) it was 8.312. Indicating that in 4 months the difficulty actually went DOWN, not up 40% as you suggest. go see for yourself: http://etherscan.io/charts/difficulty. Now if that was due to a bug, so be it, do you have a blog entry or something where they talk about that?
The Radeon R9 295X2 has by far the highest hash rate (46.0 MH/s) of the Ethereum GPUs on the market and will cost you $600. It has a power cost per day of about $1.44, a return per day of about $1.61 and a cost per MH/s of $13.04. This gives a return per year of $586.43.
Solo Mining – Solo mining means its you against the rest. If your hash is correct you win the block reward. But with a rig of 60 MH/s and a network hashing power of 1.2 GH you aren’t going to get ether very often. The other issue is you have to download the blockchain for yourself. See our guide here on how to solo mine ethereum.
I’m having the same problem as Majorano. I double checked everything up until this point and I am 95% sure it is all correct. Here is what command prompt is giving me (my .bat file is called Armageddon):
To others who are reading this comment, this tutorial is for a single slot miner. A single slot miner has an overall lower footprint, both in terms of power draw and overall cost, compared to a multi-GPU miner. They are cost-effective only for those who want to get their feet wet since the cost of entry is fairly low.
By entering the above details into an Ethereum Mining Calculator, you’ll be presented with a rough guide of your expected profits. While the calculator will automatically enter the current figure for difficulty, keep in mind that difficulty is very likely to rise in the future. Ethereum’s high price lures in more miners!
According to Morgan Stanley estimates, miners today earn roughly $1.76 each day in profits per each GPU owned. That’s up from 56 cents in October. Those figures assume the miner owns an AMD Radeon 580 and pays roughly 70 cents per day for each GPU’s electricity.
Mining Ethereum is still a worthwhile activity, provided the price of Ethereum stays around or above $200, but only if you live in a region with low utility fees. At the current difficulty rating, 97MH/s can mine a little less than 0.9 Ether coins in 30 days. As long as Ether’s market value remains higher than $40 per coin and the difficulty doesn’t spike, I break even or make money. With a 10 cents/kWh utility rate, Ether must trade for at least $60 to break even. In San Francisco, where electricity costs can reach 25 cents/kWh, you would be losing money by running the system if the price of Ether dropped below $165.
I don’t think that Tom’s going to advance mining much; our longtime enthusiast members mostly won’t get into it and it’s widely enough known already. A little extra knowledge for those of us on the sidelines and, who knows, maybe miners will concentrate on the most efficient cards and the price of the rest will go down. Not an issue for me, I’m running a fanless GT430, so what do I care about current prices?
The time-tested wisdom in mining is that it’s probably best to not assume that ETH will stay at any given price in the short term. Theoretically, it could crash at any moment. If ETH had a sudden price crash, people would be dumping their GPUs all over eBay and Craigslist — meaning much lower resale value for your hardware. It’s also wise to consider that if the difficulty continues increasing and the price doesn’t see any major bumps in the coming weeks, revenues will only be thinned even more.
The transition to the PoS-algorithm will allow to reduce energy costs as much as possible without requiring real resources, since it will not need large computing powers, and hence users with equipment. This means that miners will soon be obsolete. But while ETH mining remains traditional, ordinary users still have a chance to get a rapidly developing cryptocurrency on their wallet.
Well right now its still profitable but if the price drops below 0.02ETH and difficulty will keep going up like 40-50% everymonth then most likely in 2 months it won’t be worth the hassle…. its a gamble.
Is there a way to synchronize the animations with Minema? Everything is working fine except that, when I start the recording, the shaderpack’s animations seem to compensate for the low realtime framerate created by Minema, so all of the animations appear extremely fast in the final video. Is there anyway to fix this?
Yea, I havent gotten to test electricity costs yet. My ammeter is at my cousins, but I intend to update it once I have that. Also most miners work on a fixed electricity bill so for many this isnt particularly relevant if running it at home.
If you have multiple GPUs, you’ll notice all of them listed here. By default, ethminer will use all of the GPUs on your computer that use a similar compute function. In our case it will be using OpenCL. We’re going to be using the MinerGate pool of eth.pool.minergate.com:45791. You can go to the MinerGate website for a full list of pool URLs. We’ll also be using the account name we setup with MinerGate in this example it will be the email I used for account setup.

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