“ether mining on linux ethereum gpu mining tutorial best”

“ether mining on linux ethereum gpu mining tutorial best”

Years ago (spring of 2015) I had mined ETHEREUM (solo) using GETH in UBUNTU 14 and one time the mother board gave me some trouble so I had to change much newer MB ( may be too much newer one). After MB was changed the computer was not posting to C driver any more .Struggled many hours but at last I had to format the HD with about 250 ETH (all gone at present situation)remained inside and reinstalled GETH and in short time I lost all the interest in mining I completely abandoned my miner. At that time ETH was about only $1~2 some times 50 cents so I did not care much and left it alone all this years but I saved the HD in my draw and now it is worth 1/4 of million dollars now. Now I use TESTDISK in UBUNTU 14 and trying to go back to the state before the format to find the ETH. Please help me where I should look for (which folder which file if I can revival them) those accumulated 250 ETH exist. HOW I GET IT BACK.
An uncle is a stale block, usually beat to the blockchain by another block. The Ethereum network compensates miners for these though they receive a lesser reward. As you mine a block, you’ll receive a reward for no more than two uncle blocks included. The pay you receive is for uncles up to six blocks back.
Some miners have reported that their hash rate through Nanopool is significantly less (sometimes up to a 10% difference) than mining in other pools or on their own. Overall, though, the community seems to trust and like this pool.
DwarfPool is the third largest Ethereum mining pool. It has about thirteen percent hash rate, and it charges a two percent pool fee. It releases payouts up to five times a day. DwarfPool supports other cryptocurrencies such as Monero, Zcash, Expanse, and Groestlcoin. It has the following features;
Overclocking: Overclocking is the simpler of the two methods. Windows and ethOS support these easily through Wattman and ethos-overclocking respectively. The general rule of thumb is that increasing the mem clock by 10% increases your hashrate by 10%. You can also change the core clock. However, this has a smaller effect. Also, reducing core clock can be beneficial because it can reduce your power use and while your hashrate will be slightly lower, you could be positive overall as you’ll be using less power. The right core/mem balance will depend on your electricity cost and hashrate.
While the ROI – Return on Investment can go past a year for the Ethereum mining GPUs that have been mentioned above, it can be reduced if you opt to use more than one GPU. You will not get much by using just one video card to mine, and so deciding to purchase more than one GPU will be the best thing to do. But before you fully venture into that, you should also make yourself aware of the profit your mining rig will bring as well as the amount of money that you will spend on the energy.
Ethpool and Ethermine contribute to same pool but operate from different website. This largest pool on ethereum network with 25.0% of network hash rate power. Ethermine has currently over 62,000 miners using the pool software and Ethpool has under 900. Both Pools charge a 1% fee on rewards that you receive.
Before you can calculate you will be making, you need to calculate your hashrate and payout. To do that, you need to figure out the hashrate of your GPUs, which you can do with Google. You can also use a site like CryptoCompare to determine what the best GPU is for the money.
Dwarfpool was once the biggest ethereum mining pool, but its hash rate has since dropped to approximately 4.3%. Just like the first and second pools above, they also ask for 1% as the block fee on your rewards.
This is a very useful site for finding the hash rates on different graphics cards for Ethereum (ETHash), ZCash (EquiHash) and Monero (Cryptonight). The site also shows you the power draws for the graphics cards and will even give you the Amazon links on where to buy them, as well as suggestions for other parts you’d need to improve your mining rig. Other than that, the BuriedONE’s Youtube channel has many useful mining tips and tricks.
Then all Bitcoin mining is done remotely in the cloud. This enables the owners to not deal with any of the hassles usually encountered when mining bitcoins such as electricity, hosting issues, heat, installation or upkeep trouble.
It is to your advantage if you join an ethereum mining pool. There are many ethereum mining pools available. However, the most reliable ones are the big ones. Most of the mining pools have similar charges for the reward fee. From the list of pools that have been discussed above, choose the one that you will be comfortable with and join.
I’ve had several people ask about the NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB . Though not my first choice, this GPU can be overclocked to mine at 24.7 Mh/s while only pulling 80 watts of power.  Just like the GTX 1070 and the Rx 580, you can find this GPU conveniently sold in a six pack here, here and here for building a mining rig.
It doesn’t matter if you’re planning to do mining using Linux, ethOS or Windows. I’ve made sure to cover the steps for each. You will also find some great tips, tricks, optimizations, and solutions to common troubleshooting issues.

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