“ethereum mining calculator with hardware cost”

“ethereum mining calculator with hardware cost”

Mining is also the mechanism used to introduce Bitcoins into the system: Miners are paid any transaction fees as well as a “subsidy” of newly created coins. This both serves the purpose of disseminating new coins in a decentralized manner as well as motivating people to provide security for the system.
According to this calculator, if you started mining in January 2018, a year and a half in (day 476) you would start losing money since your Ethereum mining rig would cost more to run than it would generate in profit (again, assuming a static price in Ethereum).
The day has come, guys! After one month of preparation and struggling we are finally ready to start building your mining rigs. There are still a couple of small things left to be done but we can work on them a bit later.
A recent test of eight of the top gaming graphics cards on the market  done by HotHardware, shows the most effective Ethereum miners currently on the market, both in terms of raw hash rate (MH/s) versus the total system power draw under load.
4GB is fine. Overkill really, at least for Linux. If you have an old 2GB stick (or even 1GB!) sitting around and plan to run Linux, you’re good to go. If you want to run Windows, then 4GB is probably a realistic minimum.
An interesting notion, but my gut says overall performance will be poor for two reasons. First, memory bandwidth. premium dual-channel boards top out around 30 GB/s, yet the lowly 1050 Ti can do better than 100 GB/s. Second, even if you had the bandwidth, low shader count wouldn’t let you work with it fast enough. Also, you ‘d need iGPUs with OpenCL support, which I believe requires Haswell and later ( I know my Sandy Bridge HD 3000 doesn’t do OpenCL ). If you had a bunch of AMD APUs, that’s a different story, of course.
Sounds good? Take a deep breath before hitting magical buy hash power button from HashFlare. There is a great chance of Ethereum mining network switching from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake, which puts a lot of miners in very uncertain future. Including me. Being tied to cloud mining contract you would be dependent on the mercy of cloud contract issuer, instead of having your own mining rig where you are in a full control and can switch to other profitable minable coins after a possible Ethereum POS.
For a prelude, back in December 2017, I decided to build up to 12 GPU mining rig, using kind of dollar cost averaging – installing a new graphics card once in a month. Now, about 30 days later I have a 3 graphics card mining rig, and I’m dual mining Ether and Siacoin, These 3 cards combined gives me about 41 MH/s hashing power – which translates into some $5-$6 per day (not counting in fee for electricity)
Motherboard – ASRock H170 Pro4/D3 Intel H170 S1151/4xDDR3/2xPCIEx16/HDMI/DVI/USB3.0/ATX Motherboard. $145. This motherboard has 2x PCIe 3.0×16 and 3x PCIe 3.0×1, takes socket 1151 Intel 6th generation CPU and dual Channel DDR3/DDR3L 1866(OC) RAM. This motherboard only has 2 PCIe 3.0 x 16 slots which are too close together, so choose a better motherboard if you can.
While Ethereum mining is pretty memory-intensive, everything happens on the GPUs. System memory will be pretty much unused, so there is no reason to spend money here, especially with DDR4 prices so high.
It’s comments like this that have me scratching my head. I assume you’re solely talking about ETH mining drying up, considering this is /r/EtherMining, but why make it seem like the end of days is coming? If ETH dries up, yes it would suck, but it would take maybe an hour to download, reconfigure and re-aim your processing power at a different coin.

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