“ethereum mining pool luck”

“ethereum mining pool luck”

Gamers and computer enthusiasts upgrade their systems more than just about anyone. Motherboards, CPUs, and graphics cards sitting around after an upgrade are the perfect starting points for a hobbyist mining machine. You’ve already paid for these components and extracted value out of them. What’s more, you know their history and how well they’ve been cared for, which isn’t necessarily the case when buying discount used parts on eBay. With sufficient leftovers, you should be able to cobble together a competent mining machine, even if it’s not terribly impressive.
A miner is an investor that devotes time, computer space and energy to sorting through blocks. When the mining process hits the right harsh, they will submit their solutions to the issuer. After verification, the issuer of the currency offers rewards which are portions of the transactions they helped in verifying. They also offer digital coins in exchange for the work of miners. The result of digital mining is called proof of work system. Some currencies depend on this system alone while other use a combination of proof of stake and proof of work.
Troubleshooting tip:  Some miners have had success installing all GPU’s at once and then installing the drivers.  Others prefer to install only one card, install the drivers, shut down the system and then install the rest of the GPU’s and then just let them all be recognized by Windows (you’ll feel the system lagging, some flickers, or brief black screens while each card is detected by Windows).  
If you’re into Linux, Eth OS is a 64-bit Linux OS that mines Ethereum, Zcash, Monero, and other GPU-minable coins.  If you’re a windows guy, here is Windows 10.  If you’re going to be using Windows, you’ll need mining software.  Take a look at this Ethereum Mining on a Windows PC guide.
Listed below are the components along with the amount you will need to assemble your GPU mining rig. Once your components arrive, you will want to come back to this guide for assembly and configuration instructions. I’ve included a YouTube video further down the page with complete assembly instructions as well.
Hello, I did everything but at the end this message appear in the cmd: ETH: Stratum – connecting to ‘eu1.ethermine.org’ port 4444 No pool specified for Decred! Ethereum-only mining mode is enabled ETHEREUM-ONLY MINING MODE ENABLED (-mode 1) ETH: eth-proxy stratum mode Watchdog enabled Remote management (READ-ONLY MODE) is enabled on port 3333 ETH: Stratum – Cannot connect to eu1.ethermine.org:4444 ETH: Stratum – Failed to connect, retry in 20 sec… ….. this repeats forever When I trace that IP 93.115.31.250 it its all good – nothing is lost: C:\Users\Win10>tracert 93.115.31.250 Tracing route to hst-93-115-31-250.balticservers.eu [93.115.31.250] over a maximum of 30… Read more »
Here is our formula for working out monthly profit: M – W = P. M is the value of the amount of coins you mine per day, this be found through sites like coingecko where it will tell you how much your crypto is worth. W is the amount you will be spending on kWh every month. This will then give you P which is your monthly profit. You can also find your daily profit by inputting your daily mined crypto into M and daily power usage in for W, the same can be done for weekly calculations. To find your real profit however, you first need to pay back the first investment into your mining rig. To find out how long this will take, you must use this formula: C / P = D, where C is the cost of your mining computer, P is the same as before (monthly profit), and D is the time it will take to pay back your computer, either in months, weeks or days. This depends on what you use for the first calculation. After you pay back the rig, every cent you make will go towards your total profit.
FPGA mining is a very efficient and fast way to mine, comparable to GPU mining and drastically outperforming CPU mining. FPGAs typically consume very small amounts of power with relatively high hash ratings, making them more viable and efficient than GPU mining. See Mining Hardware Comparison for FPGA hardware specifications and statistics.
Yes in the sense that if difficulty gets too high, the number of Ether coins you get in reward doesn’t offset the cost of electricity and/or cooling.  But usually, when that happens, people tend to stop mining or move to another coin.  Once that happens, difficulty drops down and Ethereum becomes profitable again to mine.
Now, the total amount I’ve invested so far in my GPU mining rig is $1,365 – and currently, it gives me a hashing power of 41 MH/s. Again I haven’t yet calculated precise electricity consumption, but for the sake of this experiment, let’s assume it’s 300 Watts.
The Ethereum mining difficulty had been steadily increasing since July but recently dropped from a high of ~3,000T to ~1,500T. This dip was caused by the Byzantine fork but isn’t as advantageous as it seems. Even though the difficulty decreased, the block reward also decreased from 5 ETH to 3 ETH effectively canceling out any benefit from the difficulty change.
Miners expend electricity hashing that block with the processing power of their GPU(s). A successful hash result produces produce a unique Proof of Work (PoW) proving that the miner worked on that block.

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