“ethereum geth gpu mining”

“ethereum geth gpu mining”

All mining activities run on the GPUs so you won’t need a very powerful CPU to run the rig. Your CPU won’t be used during mining so a lower power chip is prefered. An Intel i3 or Celeron chip will work just fine in a LGA 1150 motherboard.
You will receive daily or weekly payouts to your Ethereum wallet address (it depends on the plan, but usually payouts are done daily). You need to pay in advance for hashing power and contracts often come in the form of a 1-year contract or unlimited (until mining with rented hardware is profitable). The only thing to keep eyes on is the current Ethereum value, so that you stay in profit and that you do not pay more for hashing power than you get out of Ethereum production.
I have ZERO computer skills, and I am sorry if this question come across as stupid but I truly don’t have a clue how this works. Do you happen to have directions for putting this together? Also, when everything is put together do I just turn it on and start mining? I am sure that I will need software to work this but do you know where I can get the software needed to run these? I am so sorry that I am asking noob questions, but I seem to always have more questions that keep popping up.
We are going to build a rig using eight graphics cards, either NVIDIA or AMD. Eight is the perfect number in this case, as Windows works well with 8 GPUs, and motherboard with slots for 8 GPUs don’t cost that much. You can always buy a motherboard with slots for up to thirteen cards, but its price is higher than the eight slot version, and you’d have to install Linux to use it. That’s why we recommend 8 GPUs.
Even so, you can still use these calculators by thinking clearly about the costs involved. Profitability calculators (for example, The Genesis Block) often ask for your electricity costs, and sometimes the initial investment in hardware. Effectively, you are being asked for your ongoing costs and your one-off investments.
Today I got a Sapphire Tri-X R9 290. They’re a beast of a card with 2 8-pin power connectors (won’t boot up with 6-pin), and it’s physically the biggest card I have. With the R9 290, I find I get ~5% better hashrate with Claymore instead of Genoil’s miner (with R9 380s, it’s almost identical). At the stock 1/1.3G clocks, I was getting 28.3Mhs, and OC to 1125 I’m getting 31.8Mhs. Only running for under 1hr at 1125, so can’t say if it is stable yet.
My personal recommendation is to keep full control of your wallets and not in the exchanges since exchanges can be hacked and you run the risk of losing your coins forever. You should also keep your coins in an offline storage for maximum security. A useful multi-wallet application which I recommend is the Jaxx Blockchain Wallet. You can store many different types of coins here including popular ones such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. This wallet also gives you full control of your private keys in case you want to move your wallet out of Jaxx. The Jaxx wallet also has mobile apps which allows you to take your cryptos with you anywhere. The Ledger Nano S is another useful multi-wallet, however it is a hardware wallet, so you will have to spend an extra portion of your budget on this. Though it does payoff with it’s increased security.
Pool fees are usually pegged as a percentage and you have to foot the payout costs, which will be deducted from your earnings. While mining from a pool is advantageous if you don’t have the heavy mining hardware, the rewards and the pay you get might not be equal to what you’d have received if you mined solo. Some pools may pay you, plus all rewards while in others you might not get paid for uncles.
You’re confusing. Considering risers in bullet no.3. you first say that SATA to 4-pin molex is unsafe because of SATA, and then you say that SATA to 6-pin PCIe molex is safe. WTH ? The current goes though the same “unsafe” SATA cable.
We are going to be using the very popular Claymore Miner.  Get the current version here from Claymore’s original Bitcointalk thread and download the current version from the Google or Mega download links he provides (don’t use other people’s links).  The current version as of the time of this writing is 9.6 and you’ll want to get the Catalyst and Cuda version (not the Linux version).  
Actually, I did talk quite a bit about the rising hash difficulty. Did you not read the last page? Did you not see on the front page where I talked about the ballooning DAG files making it harder to use older mainstream GPUs ( since most of them are 2GB VRAM or less )?
While you will still be using your GPUs or ASICs, you have the choice to choose between mining in a pool, or by yourself, hence “solo” mining. Pool mining is where you join with a group of other miners and every miner contributes to mining blocks. The difference between this and solo mining is that your payouts are more consistent. Solo mining is hard, especially if you are running a small rig because you will most likely not find a block for a very long time unless you get very lucky. You can use the Coin Warz calculator to estimate how long it will take you to mine a block by yourself. Another benefit of pool mining is that it’s more consistent. You will get your payments consistently, unlike solo mining where it may take a very long time to get your payout. I recommend the Ethermine.org and Nanopool.org pools, each have a large list of crypto-pools to choose from. You can also check if your rig is online here, as well as how much crypto you have mined.
This guide is going to show you how to build an Ethereum Mining rig yourself which has two main steps – choosing and sourcing your equipment and then putting it together! Depending on times its probably going to take you a week or so to get all the pieces and then another half a day fiddling with configurations etc. Its the same as building your own computer normally but with a few extra considerations that mainly involve which GPU’s you pick.
People I’m helping setup rigs and such are trying to go full bore right now and are willing to pay these insane prices for cards. They ask me what I think and I just say setup what you have and keep scouring for deals but don’t overpay. They won’t likely listen to that, but I also don’t want to be the person who said no and then somehow this GPU shortage causes difficulty to stall and the price skyrockets on PoS rumors or some weird super profit scenario.
This is called cloud mining. It has been happening for a long time with Bitcoin and a number of reputable providers have come to the fore where you can trust their reputation for them not to run off with your money. This is especially true of Genesis Mining who are the first to set up a batch of Ethereum Mining contracts where all you do is pay them some cash and your up and running as an Ethereum miner – as simple as that – no hassle no playing around with downloading Geth and using command prompt – and most importantly you don’t have to maintain it yourself which can be a big issue if you have to keep going to restart your computer. So it saves your time!
As for what to do with GPU’s post PoW, maybe other coins will come along but if Casper (PoS) proves itself then that kills pretty much all need for PoW on any new coins. I don’t think many people in crypto actually realize how many problems Ethereum solves and that we are looking at a pending extinction level event for just about all other alt-coins, and perhaps Bitcoin also.
Now replace “” with your Ethereum Wallet address (which starts with 0x…) so copy that from your other text file and paste it here.  Then replace “” with any name you would like to create for your miner.  We’ll use “MiningRig1” for our example, so you now have:  
The Medium Genesis Ethereum Mining contract is the latest offering from the reputable provider of outsourced crypto mining contracts. The contracts have a lifetime of two year and the Company guarantees 100% uptime by substituting their own equipment. There are no extra fees to pay on top of the original price.
Again, if your power is free (yay solar power!) and you have the money for hardware, or someone gives you hardware, and you have a room for a noisy mining rig (or rigs) then go for it. But if not, and you really believe in ETH you could just take all that money, plus $100 per month and buy ETH today.
Currently you’ll need at least 3GB of dedicated video memory (VRAM) to mine Ethereum, and this VRAM requirement is expected to grow to 4GB in 2018. It’s important to note that if you are planning to mine with a GPU that doesn’t have at least 3GB of VRAM, you won’t be able to!
BitFury is a chip producer and rig maker. The Company has recently opened data a data centre for Bitcoin mining in Georgia. Although not the most popular mining provider in the market BitFury products are solid and reliable with a fair reputation.
I am very satisfied and have more trust and faith in your mining. I just want to buy more hash, but I am very upset because I have not been able to continue to accept the card. As a result of my study, my card is normal. I’d appreciate it if you could explain why each time you refuse to accept an add-on card.
Your original link to amazon which included the picoPSU with an adapter is no longer available (404 page). Can you provide the optimal power brick adapter (link to product or recommended specifications) for use with the picoPSU 160xt in this build please?
Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin & Ethereum have grown tremendously since they were created, and as more people and businesses adopt them the value will only continue to rise. For example, Ethereum has already grown over 4000% this year alone!
Now that you have all the information you need to start mining Ethereum, the sky is the limit on what type and how many rigs you have.  Do you want to stick being a beginner or do you want to become a farmer? ?  Building mining rigs are computer nerd’s version of building a car.  It is extremely satisfying and as we know rewarding. Make sure wherever you plan on running the mining rig to have enough air flow.  GPUs running at 100% 24/7 generate a ton of heat!

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