“ethereum mining app”

“ethereum mining app”

One measure of AC efficiency is EER. It’s a measure of cooling capacity (in BTU per hour) by input power (W). A typical AC unit might have a EER of 10. If you convert the units, that’s 2.9 W of heat removed per watt of power consumption by the unit. So your cooling costs would result in an extra ~33% on your power bill, not an extra 100% (double).
If I understand you correctly, you have 3 GPUs plugged into USB-style risers (like these), which are in turn connected to your motherboard. All of your GPUs have a single 6/8 pin PCIe connector, which is connected to the PSU. The PSU’s PCIe cables each have two 6/8 pin connectors, and you want to use one of these to power each riser (the other is connected to the GPU).
Sapphire is a Graphics card producer that can be used in mining alternative crypto currencies such as Ethereum and Litecoin. See all products Sapphire has to offer and check out the profitability and returns for using them to mine ether.
Ether is an absolute essential, as it serves as fuel for the smooth running of the Ethereum platform. An interesting way to look at Ether is an incentive used to motivate developers to create top notch applications.
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Now, the total amount I’ve invested so far in my GPU mining rig is $1,365 – and currently, it gives me a hashing power of 41 MH/s. Again I haven’t yet calculated precise electricity consumption, but for the sake of this experiment, let’s assume it’s 300 Watts.
Another risk, though small, is that if you decide to mine on the ETHash algorithm you have to make sure you have enough VRAM (Video Random Access Memory) on the graphics card, as the networks DAG (Directed Acrylic Graph) will be stored on the VRAM. So if you do not have a large enough VRAM size on your GPU you will not be able to mine that coin. At the moment, Ethereum’s DAG file size is 2.1 GB meaning that you will have to mine on a card with more than 2 GBs of VRAM. You can check the DAG size for some popular coins using this website.
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I thought I’d see a well-done article, covering the basics, ESPECIALLY hashes per watts in a table… that thing is ESSENTIAL whenever you use the word “efficient” when talking about mining cryptocurrencies!
The V’s massive price tag ($3000) both ensures that it’ll take a very long time to pay for itself and puts it out of reach for the average home miner. On the other hand, if the price is okay for you, we highly recommend you to buy Titan V.
The popularity of GPU-based cryptocurrency mining has driven up the prices of particularly efficient cards. GPU manufacturers have struggled to meet demands from miners. This struggle has resulted in a noticeable shortage of certain cards, as well as inflated prices from suppliers on the “secondary market” (in other words, resellers on sites such as eBay).
2) Graphics Card – Pick your GPUs! Some graphics cards cost a fortune but don’t hash much whilst some are more reasonable but use more power. Ultimately its a balance between how powerful you want your rig to be and how much you want to spend – but a word to the wise – make sure you pick an efficient GPU. You can buy second hand GPU’s from reputable providers such as GPU Shack – be careful though when you buy them off a street corner as often they have problems that you won’t see until you get the card home and plugged in.
The ideal GPU when it comes to mining Ethereum is one which offers the highest hash-rate at the lowest power. Currently there are GPUs which provide hash-rates up to 46MH/s at the upper end and at the lower end there are GPUs which offer a hash-rate of about 24MH/s. There are many others which offer a lower hash-rate but they are quite slow and would take a long time to generate Ethereum.
Ethereum mining hardware is thus, very crucial in terms of usage and require a large amount of electricity at the same time. Therefore, in choosing efficient Ethereum mining hardware, we would have to look into the factor of cost, how much power does it take and also higher hash rate i.e. the speed of solving and completing an operation, and thus striking a balance between them.
And what energy efficient motherboard + cpu would you recommend for that case? I want to buy 2 RX 460s and maybe bump the watts to 300 I don’t mind as long as I can hash 22 MH/s on the same small machine.
It would be very power inefficient since you’re multiplying the power requirement overhead to run the rest of the system. But I love experiments. Try running it and see how it does. Linux will report all OpenCL compatible devices ( can’t remember the exact command line for it right now ) so if you explicitly call Claymore and tell it to work with a given device, it should try.
One thing you did not mention however, is you could theoretically mine at break even, and if the Eth value explodes, discover your profit at that juncture. I guess that would make you more a speculator than a miner though?
I am in the peocess of ordering parts for a good 6 card mining rig. What is the best GPU card i can get now that uses the least amount of power? What is your email? Maybe you could send me an updated list for 2018? Or are all the parts still basically the same as your first list? Thank you so much for all this help!!! ?
Noob here. Thanks for the tutorial, it was great! I built my first rig but have yet to power it up so ce i am very concerned with the way my risers would be powered after all the SATA burning we see on the internet.
If you use the 160 XT, it can work with a mismatched adapter. You can use any wattage adapter, provided it exceeds the wattage consumption of your entire computer while mining. But because your power consumption goes up dramatically when mining, you might want to go with the 160-watt adapter.
Over the last 6 months I have had purchased a small amount of hash power and I am very pleased with it. I have since bought a lot more. Anyone who is expecting to get rich quick go find some half cocked project to spend your money on. I believe this will return far far above what I could get putting my money in a bank and is far safer than buying crypto currency due to their volatility. Nothing guaranteed with anything in this world but well worth a punt. Go for it!
When it comes to picking GPUs, you want the select the best bang for the buck.  You’re looking for something with high hash rate, low cost, and low power usage.  You can start with as little as 1 GPU or as much as 7 GPUs within one rig.  Normally you see 5-6 in a mining rig as 7 is incredibly hard to make stable.
As the price of Ethereum hovers around $300, you may be wondering to yourself whether or not it’s worthwhile to begin mining. Like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a proof-of-work coin that uses miners to confirm network transactions. The profitability of mining varies from person to person and changes over time – usually becoming less profitable as the coin matures.

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