“ethereum mining dag file”

“ethereum mining dag file”

However, a high hash rate does not guarantee profits; electricity is still a big factor. The hash rate is often denoted as mega hash per second, a million calculations in a second. It can also be labeled Giga hash, which is 1000 mega hash or terra hash; this has 1000 Giga hash.Simply put, a higher hash rate means greater mining speed.
We’re going to want both the RPC client (written in Go) and the Miner (written in C++) to run simultaneously. We also want them to run in the background so that in case we drop our SSH connection, the RPC and Miner keep running. To do that, we’re going to use a tool called screen.
The Radeon R9 295X2 has by far the highest hash rate (46.0 MH/s) of the Ethereum GPUs on the market and will cost you $600. It has a power cost per day of about $1.44, a return per day of about $1.61 and a cost per MH/s of $13.04. This gives a return per year of $586.43.
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Think about it. It does not sound like much, but it is. If you have a friend that just invests 1 Bitcoin, you instantly get 0.10 Bitcoin. Your friend probably earns much more % on his 1 Bitcoin, depending on the contract he choosed.
It’s the most expensive Ti product ever, and it generally retails in the $800 range. However, mining demand has driven its price to over $1,000 in some locations. But for those who can stump up the cash, it’s a card that really looks to the future.
Again, if your power is free (yay solar power!) and you have the money for hardware, or someone gives you hardware, and you have a room for a noisy mining rig (or rigs) then go for it. But if not, and you really believe in ETH you could just take all that money, plus $100 per month and buy ETH today.
If this makes your system unstable, Radeon Settings will automatically reset to the default voltage. There is virtually no risk of permanent instability. In the worst case scenario, you can simply remove your graphics card.
The aim of bitcoin—as envisaged by Satoshi Nakamoto, its elusive creator—is to provide a way to exchange tokens of value online without having to rely on centralised intermediaries, such as banks. Instead the necessary record-keeping is decentralised into a “blockchain”, an ever-expanding ledger that holds the transaction history of all bitcoins in circulation, and lives on the thousands of machines on the bitcoin network. But if there is no central authority, who decides which transactions are valid and should be added to the blockchain? And how is it possible to ensure that the system cannot be gamed, for example by spending the same bitcoin twice? The answer is mining.
FPGA mining is a very efficient and fast way to mine, comparable to GPU mining and drastically outperforming CPU mining. FPGAs typically consume very small amounts of power with relatively high hash ratings, making them more viable and efficient than GPU mining. See Mining Hardware Comparison for FPGA hardware specifications and statistics.
For example, the GTX 1050 Ti doesn’t have a very high hashrate. However, it doesn’t consume power either. In fact, buying four 1050 Ti’s would cost you the same as buying one R9 295X2 and they have a higher profit ratio.
The most energy efficient GPUs around come from Nvidia. Unfortunately, Nvidia GPUs aren’t quite as good at solving cryptographic hashes as AMD hardware. More or less, if you want energy efficiency (without paying a fortune for a 1070 or 1080), your only option is an AMD graphics card. The most energy efficient of these is the AMD Radeon RX 460 or RX 470 (or the pricier RX 560 and RX 570). The RX 470 pulls around 145 watts, with the recommended power supply for it producing around 350 total watts. The RX 460 on the other hand, uses a total of 75 watts. That makes it easier to deploy on single-card mining rigs.
When Ethereum started off, the original vision was to have it mined via the CPU itself. The primary reason behind this (and making mining Ethereum ASIC-resistant) is that this will help provide fair competition. (While this is debatable it is still fairer than ASIC-led mining). However, while the original intention was to have Ether mined on CPU, miners soon discovered that the GPU led mining is faster because it provides a greater hashing power.
Currently you need to allow ‘access control expose headers’ if you don’t in your browser. The Etherchain API does not have the headers for this loaded in, so I couldn’t get cross domain requests to work, they kept getting rejected for “No ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header is present on the requested resource” if anybody has any ideas. Anyways, if the calc doesn’t load for you, you can install that CORS plugin and it will work. Hope to have that resolved soon.
How much hash rate increase do you think you can get by getting a 2nd stick of 2gb ram in there? And is it better for power to use a single 4gb stick or 2 x 2gb sticks? What would be the increase in hash rate with say 8 or 16gb?
I have a mining rig at home as well to compare the income variations. (you can check any ETH mining difficulties chart which is available online too). What i can conclude is that the Genesis Mining payout declining speed is faster than the actual mining difficulty increase rate.
There are currently about 2.5 million GPUs mining Ethereum. The rating for efficiency can be determined by dividing the hashrate by the power draw. This is a primary indicator, which shows how profitable your mining operations will be in the future (after the payback period), given that electricity is a fixed, ongoing cost. The more efficient your card (newer cards are usually more efficient), the more profitable it will be once you’ve received the ROI.
I purchased 6 1070 FTW edition GPUs and they have two 8-pin power connectors each. Do I need to get more powers supplies to accommodate the extra 8-pin slot? Also, should I have connector branch from the power supply to both 8-pin slots or give each slot on the GPU its own connector to the power supply?

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