“ethereum mining on windows vs linux”

“ethereum mining on windows vs linux”

While it is too early to remark on the Monero contract in great detail – as I just purchased it, I am very satisfied with my early experience with Genesis Mining. My questions were addressed with informative and thoughtful responses. The user experience is intuitive. I have already recommended Genesis Mining to friends and family members. Moreover, I have upped my investment as I feel that I am working with a team that values integrity.
The mining demand has driven prices well above their normal retail price, but when it comes to a relatively cheap videocards with a solid performance currently available on the market, AMD’s R9 390(X) seems to beat other cards. Even though it tends to be a relatively old card (the R9 series was introduced back in 2015), it has aged far more gracefully than the more recent RX 400 / 500 series (which launched in 2016 and 2017, respectively).
I think a lot of people are confused over what profitability really means. Sure everyone knows profit = revenue – cost. However, profitability of mining ETH is not simply “do I mine more ETH than cost of electricity?” This neglects the GPU/HW where it’s instrumentally important in both the revenue and the cost. If you’re doing it right, the price of the GPU/HW will be at least 2x the cost of the electricity for the whole mining lifespan of the card. Additionally, we’d hope that the final value of the HW is > $0.
Now you’re talking about difficulty increase of 100%, which with this rate is easily going to happen before summer, might even be by march. Hopefully price will increase as well, but at some point we’ll be seeing a saturated market (especially once ETH goes PoS), so your prediction here is that 12-18months payback period. While i’d not speculate more than 6-8 months in the future. Because we can’t possibly know what will happen once PoS happens.
So if you’re looking for a way to pay off some new gaming GPUs, you could technically mine them for a few months to pay them off, but if you’re expecting to become an Ether millionaire, and you don’t have a massive operation already–it’s probably a pipe dream.
“Thanks to CoinMiner I’m the proud owner of a 240Mh/s beast. It’s making money and a quick, secure return on investment with massive potential for increases. I love mining and am considering starting a mining farm.”
As for what to do with GPU’s post PoW, maybe other coins will come along but if Casper (PoS) proves itself then that kills pretty much all need for PoW on any new coins. I don’t think many people in crypto actually realize how many problems Ethereum solves and that we are looking at a pending extinction level event for just about all other alt-coins, and perhaps Bitcoin also.
With a modest rate of Hash power that stands at 24 MH/s, Radeon RX 470 has comparable features of Radeon RX 480. There are however minor differences between Radeon RX 470 and Radeon RX 480 which was designed initially as a graphic card for gaming activities. Popularity of this graphic processing unit for mining activities can be attributed to its robust processing power and satisfactory hash rates. In contrast, Radeon RX 470 was built for Ethereum mining right from the word go.
Furthermore, managing equipment can prove highly laborsome, particularly because skilled technician are few and far between. Repairs can crop up regularly, and changes in mining clients and software/hardware configurations constantly demand attention. Maintenance fees can end up eating away at larger and larger percentages of daily profits.
Cold Storage   This is the process of moving your bitcoins to an offline wallet. The benefit of this is that no one can hack into your computer and steal your private keys if your computer is not connected to a network. Bitcoins will need to be brought back out of cold storage to be spent or transferred again.
The next risk, while not severe, is power. Mining computers draw a lot of power, and depending on the size of the rig, they can easily draw upwards of 1,000 watts. Depending on where you live this could mean that you are mining at a loss everyday.
But even on the pragmatic side, cryptographic mining never made much sense to me. The profit margin is often so short-lived that by the time the average tech enthusiast hears about it, the bubble is ripe to burst. Once a mining algorithm moves to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), it’s impossible to compete otherwise. Even if the crypto currency du jour doesn’t go ASIC, the mining pool can get saturated, and anyone without a quad-GPU farm (or better) may as well be trying to get to the moon with a sliderule (wait, we did that . . .).
It’s not gonna plateau. What all the stores being sold out means, is that a shit load of gpu’s are being bought straight through the major suppliers for large farms, and new cards are going online just as fast as they are being made. What you proposed would be true if production was down, but it’s not. What we’d want to see is cards cathering dust on the shelves at retail stores. What’s happening right now is the worst possible realistic screnario when it comes to the difficulty.
Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud or third party interference. Ether, the platforms own native cryptocurrency is mined with the “Eth-hash” algorithm. Earned Ethers can be autotraded in the dashboard to Bitcoin, Zcash and other Cryptocurrencies.
The Process of mining is essential to decentralized Ethereum network as it is used in smooth functioning, verification, and propagation of blocks, apart from an increase in the number of circulation of Ether. Ether is rewarded as an incentive for more people to join the blockchain and increase the network width.
Yes, but if you’re getting your profit from the increased market price for the crypto, wouldn’t make more sense to just invest the total amount into the crypto itself? Otherwise you would be spending a good amount for electricity + hardware and would have to reach ROI before actually making money.
3) Hard Drive – You need a hard drive to store your operating system and your software for mining. A standard SSD drive will do (an SSD hard drive is just a storage device and is called solid state as there aren’t moving bits which can break). The size will depend on what you are planning to do when mining. If you are planning to download the entire blockchain and mine as shown in this guide here – then you will need to take into account how big the blockchain will become and need to spend a little more. If you are just going to mine ethereum as part of a pool then you don’t need to store the blockchain and can get a smaller SSD drive. We used the SSDNow V300 120GB. Buy it here.
Ethereum is about to switch from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake scheme called Casper. Some of the included incentives for this transition are higher scalability, improved protocol economics, environmental friendliness, and easier implementation of sharding protocols. It is currently not yet decided when Ethereum is switching to PoS, but it’s reasonable to expect that it will occur in late 2018. If Ethereum switches to proof of stake, I’m not sure what role miners will have, but it’s possible that Ethereum mining will no longer be possible after that, unless a hybrid Proof of Work/Proof of Stake model is implemented.
But now, with difficulty going through the roof with everyone mining every card they can get their hands on, and coin prices seemingly dropping 5-10% a day….I think the ship either has sailed or at least is pulling out of the dock. They could gamble and win if coin prices spike again, but I feel bad for people jumping in now since most will be lucky to break even.
Start out small. I don’t recommend starting out by buying hundreds of graphics cards and miners, especially if you have no previous experience with mining. If you start out small you can easily upgrade in the future by either adding rigs to your farm, or by adding graphics cards to your rigs.
Time to break-even is calculated by comparing your hardware cost (which you must enter below) to your predicted monthly profits and seeing how until the initial hardware cost is paid off. The calculator also takes the changing difficulty (diff change) into account. If the network difficulty is increasing quickly, this will greatly increase your break-even time. The diff change can be excluded from the calculation by toggling the “Use Diff Change” switch.
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GPU stands for Graphic Processing Unit. Most high end machines come with high-end GPUs these days. Basically this is a dedicated processor in your computer which handles graphics processing, thereby taking the load off your CPU which will perform actual computational tasks while the GPU takes care of the graphics.
An interesting notion, but my gut says overall performance will be poor for two reasons. First, memory bandwidth. Even premium dual-channel boards top out around 30 GB/s, yet the lowly 1050 Ti can do better than 100 GB/s. Second, even if you had the bandwidth, low shader count wouldn’t let you work with it fast enough. Also, you ‘d need iGPUs with OpenCL support, which I believe requires Haswell and later ( I know my Sandy Bridge HD 3000 doesn’t do OpenCL ). If you had a bunch of AMD APUs, that’s a different story, of course.

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