“ethereum mining rx 570 best”

“ethereum mining rx 570 best”

It’s important to note that purchasing used cards from crypto miners is not recommended, because these cards run 24/7 well below their base spec. Many people are selling their cards that have been damaged due to mining (bad over-clocks for extended period of time damages both the processor and ram on the GPU itself).
The next step is to setup pool mining, as solo-mining is unlikely to make you any Ethereum unless you have a warehouse full of GPUs. Your first step will be to choose an Ethereum mining pool. There are plenty to choose from but we recommend Nanopool or Etheremine. The home page or help section of a mining pool site most likely contains instructions on how to mine on their pool using the popular Claymore miner.  
On the whole, your hardware, excluding GPUs, shouldn’t cost you more than $500, and the large part of this will be your PSU. Below is a recommended purchase list from Amazon. The total without the GPUs comes to $472.21. While with 6 RX480s your total cost would be $1702.15 sans shipping costs.
Now you are connected and mining you should start receiving ethereum to your address. However this depends on what you are mining with – if its your CPU it will be tiny, and if its your graphics card it will be a lot more as Ethash was designed to be mined on GPU’s. You can check out graphics cards here and see how much they mine, their efficiency and profit ratios! 
Heelo Peter, kerdezni szertnem ha a pc hez amit fel epitek es el inditom a soft-ot, kell meg hoza egy tuning soft ami szabajoza a dolgokat? ugy olvastam azt is kell csinalni hogy be legyen alitva egy optimalis run-ra es utana mindig valamit alitani benne? Koszonom
Form factor: ATX | GPU Support: 13 | Processors supported: 7th and 6th Generation Intel Core i7/i5/i3/Pentium/Celeron (Socket 1151) | Slots: 1 x PCI Express 3.0 x16, 12 x PCI Express 2.0 x1, 2 x DDR4 DIMM
The Gigabyte GA-H110-D3A is one of the best mining GPUs on the market, and if you don’t need the ability to run 13 GPUs at once, then this may be a better purchase. It can still handle six GPUs, and it has excellent built quality which means this motherboard can withstand the intensive use mining for cryptocurrencies entails. It also includes electrostatic, power failure and high temperature protection, which is essential for a machine running 24/7. Unlike some other mining motherboards, the Gigabyte GA-H110-D3A can also be used for non-mining applications, giving it a flexibility if you find mining isn’t for you.
The card also excels at mining. The hashrate of this card tends to be 70 Mh/s, but it increases up to 82 MH/s when it’s pushed to its limits. One more thing worth noting is that the power consumption doesn’t exceed 215 W. In the raw hash power stakes, Titan V puts Nvidia far ahead in the raw hash-power stakes, and beats out the closest rival from AMD – RX Vega 64, which consumes more power consumption if overclocked. Titan V is super efficient and can be overclocked up to 82 Mh/s, while the Radeon RX Vega 64 only reaches about 45 MH/s and consumes more power.
At a high level, the goal of buffered pooled mining is to allow each participant in a mining pool to draw ethereum on demand from their current and future hashrate contribution without waiting for a long or unpredictable amount of time. This quantity of ethereum is large enough for many programming purposes, such as micropayments.
With mining rigs, you want the lowest clocked CPU, bare minimum RAM, 5,6 or 7 GPUs and a very basic HD.   Oh, and as you can see from the picture, you don’t want nor can you fit all those GPUs instead of a normal case.  You can use a nice custom made case as you see above or something cheap like a milk crate.
Mist also contains Geth, a popular command line interface. You may choose to get only the latest Geth app for your system, it’s able to perform all the functions of Mist (and more) from the command line. Geth (an abbreviation for “go-ethereum”) allows you and your miner to interact more directly with the Ethereum network but Geth definitely requires some programming knowledge.
Ethereum’s Ethash algorithm is just one of several algorithms intended for optimal mining on GPUs and is used to secure the network and empowers end users to have full control of their money. This algorithm was designed to prevent the development of dedicated ASICs to mine it. SHA-256 and Scrypt are extremely compute-hungry, consequently rendering ASICs more efficient than our graphics cards (even more so than CPUs). On the other hand, Ethash is rather dependent on memory performance (timing, frequency, and bandwidth). Generally speaking, a GPU is good for mining all GPU-mineable cryptocurrency (including Ethereum Classic (ETC), Zcash (ZEC), Monero (XMR), and Vertcoin (VTC)), which gives GPU miners enviable flexibility, in order to be able to switch between over 40 coins that are based on their current profitability.
Consider the mining pool fees. Some mining pools have high fees while some have low fees. When deciding on the right mining pool, try to pick the mining pool with a reasonable and affordable mining pool fee.
You do have some great information on mining with the GTX 1070, thank you. But you don’t mention the 1070 Ti, how come? According to other research I have found that the 1070 Ti is actually more efficient, and faster than the 1070 so overall it can cost less and mine more.
At the opposite pole, Ether was designed to take advantage of GPU processing power rather than CPU power, and was also designed in a way that would prevent ASICs and FPGAs from taking over, thus ensuring that “the power” remains in the hand of the people. The best way to increase Ether mining performance is simply get as many suitable video cards as you possibly can, and put them all to work. It’s not all about quantity, but also about quality, so choosing the right cards for the job is crucial.
Basically, you need to get the necessary GPUs, as many as are necessary or affordable and looks for the most efficient ones. They are usually hard to find. Next, get a motherboard and a power unit which can support all your GPUs at once. You may also need a CPU, RAM, a processor and a rigged case. The most important necessity here, however, is the management of the rig, settling the payment agreements for the respective miners, based on their performance, and their charges also, as the case may be.
1x RAM (System Memory) –  4 GB RAM – You don’t need a lot of system memory to mine ethereum effectively. 4GB is about as small as a stick of RAM comes these days, so I recommend just picking up a cheap one as long as it is DDR 4 desktop memory.
The Titan Xp can be overclocked to 42 MH/s, but it will consume 300 W when pushed that hard. It achieves an excellent hash rate without too much expenditure of power. Meanwhile, its top-end AMD rival, the RX Vega 64, achieves a very similar performance for about half the price.
Now that your miner is set up, you’re able to sit back and watch as your video cards gain you passive income every month in the form of Ethereum. It is important to consider any variable costs that you may incur during the mining to determine your profitability. Variable costs may be electrical costs, maintenance costs, pool fees, dev fees, exchange fees, etc.
Do you mine Ethereum for fun? Then the numbers might not mean a lot to you. Though chances are you want to rake in some money from your venture, so the numbers matter to you. There are many ETH mining calculators you can use online and they give valid results.
Dwarfpool – The last of our top performing Ethereum pools is Dwarfpool (https://dwarfpool.com). Dwarfpool uses a RBPPS payment method (round based pay per share), which is based on the PPS method. Autopayouts are done hourly and they guarantee 100% uptime due to their distributed infrastructure. Dwarfpool makes up about 13% of the network hashrate.
The GTX 1070 is an amazing graphics card, where it’s only let down is it’s expensive price. However, this card achieves amazing hash rates on the ETHash and EquiHash algorithms, and draws a mere 150 Watts. My personal rig uses 4 GTX 1070’s, so I highly recommend these cards, especially if you can get them for a good price. This card is an excellent performer when it comes to gaming, so if you decide to sell your rig, you should be able to sell these cards for a great price. With 8 GBs of onboard VRAM, you will not have to worry about an increasing DAG file.
Ethermine is a high-performing ether mining pool and is a direct successor of the ethpool.org. This miner offers the same level of service and efficiency as its predecessor, ethpool.org but makes its payments via the traditional PPLNS mode. In ethermine pays instantly and individual miners on this platform will receive their ether as soon as they attain the set payment threshold.
The mining of Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies will continue to be profitable for a long time, and it is likely that after having solved the first challenges (hardware selection, equipment assembly, etc.) you will ask what is the next step. If you have decided to mine this cryptocurrency and have the necessary equipment, the next thing to do is join an Ethereum mining group (or  mining pool ).
Install your GPU Drivers like you normally would (Next, next, Ok, etc.) and reboot.  Afterward, you know your GPU’s are recognized correctly if you go into Device Manager (search in Windows search bar) and you don’t see any warning marks on your GPU’s and it shows them correctly like this:  
F2pool – Also known as Discus Fish (https://www.f2pool.com/).  F2pool has been operational since 2013 and contribute about 24% of the network hashrate.  Payments are also made via the PPS method and on a daily basis. The site is predominantly Chinese but has an English interface and has servers across Asia to ensure security and redundancy. F2pool can also be used as a litecoin mining pool.
Now that you’ve figured out how much you are going to make and how much you are going to be spending, you can then see how long it will take for your mining to pay off and decide if it is worth it to you or not.
What is the best ethereum pool? The answer is, not one. All are equally as reliable as then next. The only differences they have is fees they charge. It’s also important to be close to server for better connection and speed.
Another interesting option is the AMD R9 390X – a card capable of a hash rate of around 30 MH/s, and a price tag just slightly larger than what the RX480s and RX580s sell for. The AMD R9 390X is the predecessor of the RX480 and uses an older architecture, but its 512-bit memory interface allows it to provide better performance. Just as in the case of the 295×2, though, the AMD R9 390X is discontinued, but there are still a few new units out there. As for the used ones, people selling these tend to be tech-savvy people that have a good idea of what they are selling, so don’t expect to find them very cheap. Nevertheless, the fact that the R9 390X offers more than half the hash performance of a 295×2 for less than half of the power consumption and, more importantly, you can actually find one of these cards on the market, makes it a very appealing option.

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